16-year-old Pinay discovers the use of “Aratiles” to cure Diabetes

Every single day, medical scientists are working hard to discover new medicines to aid in making people live longer and healthier. True enough, their effort is recognized all over the world by the advancement in our medicines.

Aside from these amazing brains that continue to work, there are also random people who make amazing discoveries that can greatly benefit the majority. Just like this amazing discovery made by a 16-year-old Filipina – the use of the common fruit, Aratiles in curing Diabetes!

The Aratiles tree is a fast-growing tree with cotton candy flavored fruit which in common in tropical countries like the Philippines. It is a small fruit, about the size of a blueberry. Unripe green fruit turns orange to red when ripe.

The Aratiles fruit is juicy, somewhat gelatinous inside. The fruit is sweet and the smell/flavor is very close to cotton candy. Yes, it is not a typo; cotton candy on a tree. It’s kind of amazing.

The girl who was able to unveil this medicinal use of Aratiles in Maria Isabel Layson, a Special Science Class student of Iloilo National High School.

Because of her brilliant discovery, she was able to win the 2019 National Science and Technology Fair which led her to become part of the Philippine delegation to one of the world’s largest pre-college science research competition called 2019 Intel International Science and Engineering Fair (ISEF) held at Phoenix, Arizona, USA.

In RMN’s interview with Layson, she said that her research was centered on Diabetes because this is considered the “top cause” of death not only here in the Philippines but in the whole world.

Through Layson’s research which was entitled “Bioactive Component, Antioxidant Activity, and Antidiabetic Properties of Muntingia calabura Linn. An In Vitro Study” she discovered the potential use of Aratiles to two types of Diabetes.

According to Layson, her research concluded that all of the plant parts of the Aratiles contains anti-oxidants which helps in fighting diabetes. She also emphasized that it is not only the fruit of the Aratiles that can be used but also its roots, branches, leaves, flowers and all the other parts of the tree.

We congratulate Layson for yet another amazing discovery and may she continue to discover more as she explores the future ahead of her. Kudos!